Image:  Freya Jobbins, Mask #1, FIREWALL series, 2020, 100cm x 80cm Cotton Rag Limited Edition. Photographer Freya Jobbins. Model Jacinta Jobbins.

 

Gallery 2: Freya Jobbins

FIREWALL (strange times)

21 aug. — 26 sep. 2020

Freya Jobbins is a multidisciplinary artist based in the Wollondilly region whose sustainable practice includes assemblage, collage, photography, video and printmaking.

This new body of work ‘FIREWALL (strange times)’ exhibited in Gallery 2 continues on from Jobbins’ current practice. Using mask as a metaphor, the work addresses taboo subjects and unspoken fears. The exhibition includes five masks constructed from the body parts of plastic toys, accompanied by an image of each mask.

Throughout history, the mask as a facial accessory has carried significant meanings and functions. In contemporary Australian culture, the facial mask carries an altogether new association, viewed as a utility object with a function. The mask can also now be a statement of public fear, personal security, protection, a social firewall, even a disguise. Seeing a person masked may cause less fear, considered to be positive public hygiene practice. Continuing on from Jobbins’ previous works that reference contemporary subjects including domestic violence and mental health issues, the artists explores the ubiquity of the facial mask associated with positive health. 

'We all wear masks, and the time comes when we cannot remove them without removing some of our own skin' - Andre Berthiaume.

Image:  Freya Jobbins, Mask #1, FIREWALL series, 2020, 100cm x 80cm Cotton Rag Limited Edition. Photographer Freya Jobbins. Model Jacinta Jobbins.

 

Gallery 2: Freya Jobbins

FIREWALL (strange times)

21 aug. — 26 sep. 2020

Freya Jobbins is a multidisciplinary artist based in the Wollondilly region whose sustainable practice includes assemblage, collage, photography, video and printmaking.

This new body of work ‘FIREWALL (strange times)’ exhibited in Gallery 2 continues on from Jobbins’ current practice. Using mask as a metaphor, the work addresses taboo subjects and unspoken fears. The exhibition includes five masks constructed from the body parts of plastic toys, accompanied by an image of each mask.

Throughout history, the mask as a facial accessory has carried significant meanings and functions. In contemporary Australian culture, the facial mask carries an altogether new association, viewed as a utility object with a function. The mask can also now be a statement of public fear, personal security, protection, a social firewall, even a disguise. Seeing a person masked may cause less fear, considered to be positive public hygiene practice. Continuing on from Jobbins’ previous works that reference contemporary subjects including domestic violence and mental health issues, the artists explores the ubiquity of the facial mask associated with positive health. 

'We all wear masks, and the time comes when we cannot remove them without removing some of our own skin' - Andre Berthiaume.